News
2004

News Archive
2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2005 - 2006 - 2007 - 2008 - 2009

Study finds that cleaning Pennypack is a group effort F. X. Browne, Inc. Project Engineer Presents Papers at Low-Impact Development Seminar
Pennypack project involves 3 counties F. X. Browne, Inc. Hired to Perform Palatine Lake Study
Battle for the Pennypack

F. X. Browne, Inc. President Presents at PA Lake Management Society Conference (PALMS)

Island in Lenape Park to be Highlighted

Pennypack Watershed Partnership holds Public Meeting on Future of Pennypack Creek

Lake Carey gets word on water quality Pennypack Watershed Partnership holds Workshop for Homeowners
Pennypack Watershed Partnership Event: Water Watchers –How to Start A Neighborhood Stream Monitoring Program Group Drafting Plan to Protect the Pennypack
Reading selects environmental consultant F. X. Browne, Inc. for City Park Pond Remediation Project F. X. Browne, Inc. Greenway Plan Wins Award from ANJEC
F. X. Browne, Inc. volunteer time to promote the preservation of open space and natural habitat for the protection of the Wissahickon Creek.  F. X. Browne, Inc. Wastewater Treatment Facility Design Wins Award
Pennypack Watershed Partnership: Surveys Mailed to Watershed Residents for Rivers Conservation Plan Marketing Manager Hired at F. X. Browne, Inc.
Buried Treasure in Lake Lily.  Article by Dredging & Port Construction” magazine. (.pdf)

December 29, 2004

Buried Treasure in Lake Lily.  Article by "Dredging & Port Construction” magazine. (.pdf)


December 29, 2004

Marketing Manager Hired at F. X. Browne, Inc.

Lansdale, Pennsylvania – F. X. Browne, Inc. recently hired Sherry Riesner as Manager, Marketing and Client Relations for its headquarters in Lansdale.

Sherry Riesner brings 10 years of marketing and business development experience to F. X. Browne, Inc., including the creation and management of educational programs and strategic alliances.  Her responsibilities include promoting the firm’s Low Impact Development services, which combine sustainable approaches to ecological landscape design with rigorous civil and environmental engineering.  F. X. Browne, Inc. assists its clients in developing site designs that meet the standards of the Delaware Valley Smart Growth Alliance and the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED certification program. 

Ms. Riesner holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, is a Senior Associate with the Environmental Leadership Program for the Philadelphia Region, and serves on the Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) for Montgomery Township.


December 21, 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. Wastewater Treatment Facility Design Wins Award

Lansdale, PA - The Central Avenue Wastewater Treatment Facility in Burlington Township, New Jersey, received the 2004 New Jersey Environmental Excellence Award for Innovative Technology.   Designed by F. X. Browne, Inc. and the first of its kind in the U.S., this innovative 3.65 million gallon per day Phased Isolation Ditch treatment plant saved the township $4 million in construction costs and continues to save thousands of dollars each year in operations and maintenance costs.

The Environmental Excellence Award was given by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection, together with NJ’s Corporation for Advanced Technology and League of Municipalities.  Mayor Joseph D. Foy, Senior accepted this award on behalf of Burlington Township.


December 8, 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. Greenway Plan Wins Award from ANJEC

Lansdale, PA – The Crosswicks Creek/Doctors Creek Greenway Plan developed by F. X. Browne, Inc. received an award from the Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions (ANJEC) for its multi-municipal cooperative approach.  The plan, which was developed with the combined support of six municipal environmental commissions, identifies preservation and management strategies to protect water quality and scenic, historic and recreational resources. 


The Intelligencer

November 15, 2004

Group Drafting Plan to Protect the Pennypack

By PAUL RUPPEL

[Subtitle from print edition: The process began one year ago.  A draft plan will be completed by August, with completion expected in November 2005.  On the web: www.phillywater.org/Pennypack]

Reconnecting the creek with the people who live within its watershed is the principle goal of the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan.

An overview of the plan, which is funded with a Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources grant and sponsored by the Philadelphia Water Department and other partners, was presented last week to Horsham Council.

Mainly, the plan will review land uses within the watershed, target open space for acquisition and try to find the money needed to buy that land.

The study is one of two being done on the Pennypack, and one of four being done on watersheds in which Horsham is situated, said township manager Michael McGee.

Another study by Temple University's Center for Sustainable Communities and slated for completion near the new year will deal more with flood plain and storm water management issues, McGee said. The rivers conservation plan focuses more on water quality and public awareness.

Kate Blansett, an engineering associate with the Lansdale-based environmental consulting firm of F. X. Browne Inc., said parts of Horsham that fall within the Pennypack watershed are especially important because they comprise its headwaters.

One of the plan's goals is to educate the public about watershed management and conservation.

Pointing to a land use map, Blansett noted that some of the creek's path was lined with green to show parks and preserved lands, but a predominant blue mark denoted single-family homes.

"Over 60 percent of the watershed is devoted to residential uses, which means a lot of runoff and the flooding problems everyone talks about," she said.

While recognizing Philadelphia's work over the years in water quality management, McGee reiterated a statement he has made before that he believes Horsham's zoning ordinances are the most environmentally friendly of any in the Pennypack watershed.

One citizen took exception with that statement.

Edwin Thompson of Mann Road, who has a lawsuit pending against Horsham and a home developer related to storm water management, said, "It's one thing to have these ordinances. It's another thing to apply and enforce them."

Wednesday's presentation was one of 20 community meetings planned as part of the planning process.

Paul Ruppel can be reached at (215) 957-8168 or pruppel@phillyBurbs.com.


November 3, 2004

Pennypack Watershed Partnership holds Workshop for Homeowners

WORKSHOP:          “Leave Only Footprints: Managing Your Household for Watershed Conservation”

WHEN:                      Tuesday, November 16, 2004, 7-9PM

WHERE:                   Fairmount Park’s Pennypack Environmental Education Center

                                8600 Verree Road, Philadelphia, PA 19115

Make your household “watershed friendly”! The Pennypack Watershed Partnership will hold a two-hour workshop for homeowners interested in reducing their impact on the environment, saving money, and beautifying their homes. The workshop will feature speakers from F. X. Browne, Inc., the consulting firm preparing the Pennypack Watershed Rivers Conservation Plan.  F. X. Browne, Inc. is a Lansdale-based, nationally recognized environmental consulting firm, specializing in environmental planning, restoration and design.

For more information or to register contact Barbara Baier at F. X. Browne, Inc. at (215) 362-3878 or bbaier@fxbrowne.com.

More about the Pennypack Watershed Partnership:

The Pennypack Watershed Partnership, a consortium of stakeholders including the Philadelphia Water Department, Friends of the Pennypack Creek and Fairmount Park Commission, are developing a Rivers Conservation Plan (RCP) for the Pennypack Creek Watershed.  The two-year RCP process focuses on expanding and energizing community-based stewardship throughout the watershed and providing a long-term vision for the conservation and protection of the creek. The RCP project consists of several components including a public participation program, data collection and analysis, and the preparation of the Rivers Conservation Plan document.  This project is partially funded by a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.


November 2, 2004

Pennypack Watershed Partnership holds Public Meeting on Future of Pennypack Creek

EVENT:         Public Meeting for Pennypack Creek Watershed Rivers Conservation Plan

WHEN:          Tuesday, November 9, 2004, 7:30PM

WHERE:       Bucks County Courthouse, Community Room - Main and Court Streets in Doylestown

Let your voice be heard! The Pennypack Watershed Partnership will hold a public meeting to discuss the development of a Rivers Conservation Plan for the Pennypack Creek Watershed. The meeting will feature speakers from F. X. Browne, Inc., the consulting firm preparing the Rivers Conservation Plan, the Philadelphia Water Department and the Southeast Montgomery Chapter of Trout Unlimited

F. X. Browne, Inc. is a Lansdale-based, nationally-recognized environmental consulting firm, specializing in environmental planning, restoration and design.  Following the speakers, PWD and F. X. Browne, Inc. will moderate a question and answer period during which residents can address issues such as water quality, pollution sources, open space protection, flooding, fishing, recreational facilities, land development, and other issues. 

For more information, please contact Barbara Baier at F. X. Browne, Inc. at (215) 362-3878 or bbaier@fxbrowne.com.


October 20, 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. President Presents at PA Lake Management Society Conference (PALMS)

Lansdale, Pennsylvania – F. X. Browne, Inc. president, Dr. Frank X. Browne, P.E. and project manager and senior project scientist Jason E. Smith are guest speakers at the 15th annual conference of the Pennsylvania Lake Management Society (PALMS) entitled “Integrated Approaches to Lake Management.”  The conference will be held in State College, PA on October 21-22, 2004.

 Dr. Browne will speak about “On-Site Disposal and Wastewater Treatment Plants for Lake Communities,” and Jason Smith will present a session on “GIS for Lake Management”.

Dr. Browne founded the Society and was the first PALMS president, and Jason Smith serves on the PALMS Board of Directors.


September 22, 2004

Reading selects environmental consultant F. X. Browne, Inc. for City Park Pond Remediation Project

The City of Reading has awarded F. X. Browne, Inc. the contract for the City Park pond remediation project. The goals of the project are to evaluate the physical integrity of the pond, improve pond water quality and aesthetics, and restore the natural flows to and from the pond. F. X. Browne, Inc. is nationally recognized as an expert in lake and watershed management and water quality studies.

F. X. Browne, Inc. will develop engineering plans and details for the restoration of the pond, which may include testing and dredging pond sediments, repairing the pond bottom lining and restoring natural spring flows, and designing a pondscaping plan that uses native plantings to restore a visually-pleasing riparian buffer around the pond that will discourage the congregation of nuisance waterfowl. The buffer will also serve to filter stormwater runoff and reduce maintenance. F. X. Browne, Inc. will also outline a pond watershed management plan to maintain the improved water quality in the pond over the long term and to manage nuisance waterfowl populations.


September 18, 2004

The Intelligencer

Battle for the Pennypack

By SHAILA DANI

The headwaters of the Pennypack Creek are situated in Upper Southampton and Warminster and in bordering towns just over the county line in Montgomery County.

These winding tributaries include Southampton Creek and eventually flow into the Pennypack. They play a vital role in the health of the entire 56-square-mile watershed, which affects 650,000 homes and spans three counties.

"The battles for water quality are won and lost in the headwaters," said Shandor Szalay, a scientist with F.X. Browne Inc., the firm that is working to clean up the Pennypack. "What happens in the headwaters affects the entire stream system."

Upper Southampton resident Hans Peters, a member of the Southampton Watershed Association, is working to get his group involved with the Pennypack project. He said a third of the township is in the Pennypack watershed.

"If we wait 'till things get to a crisis situation, then it's too late," he said.

The problems affecting the health of the degraded Pennypack Creek and its tributaries are typical of other watersheds that have been heavily urbanized. This development destroyed once pristine ecological environments, and, in the case of historic Bucks County, goes back hundreds of years.

The degradation began with the growth of agriculture in the area, which introduced pollutants like fertilizer into streams. Also, there are several dams in the Pennypack system, which were built for mills that no longer exist. These impede the movement of fish and interrupt water flow, said Szalay. But the biggest problem in the watershed, he said, is a large volume of dirty storm-water runoff.

Long ago, forests and fields covered the ground, which helped rainwater trickle slowly and steadily back into the stream system after heavy rains.

With the growth of housing developments and paved roads, permeable area for rainwater to filter through decreased. Because this increased impervious space, storm-water management systems were built. These now provide direct conduits for dirty storm water that has picked up car oil and fluids, fertilizer and sediment to be dumped into the creek system.

"We are not trying to say economic development is harmful," said Szalay. "You can have an urban environment with a healthy and clean and beautiful stream. It just takes a community that is motivated and engaged and smart strategies that are based on good science."

Pollution in the river, which is often carried in by storm-water runoff, disrupts water quality and creates an environment that is inhospitable to some plants and animals. This results in less wildlife variety, which disrupts the food chain, said Szalay.

He added that because of the increase in impervious space in the watershed, storm water flows into creeks at a much faster rate, causing erosion.

"The streams are forced to handle more water than they can," said Szalay, noting that the Pennypack empties directly into the Delaware. "These issues range from very local to even regional (to the) global scale problem of managing oceans."

The project, called the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan, includes many local partners. It is sponsored by the Philadelphia Water Department and was partially funded by a grant from the state Department of Natural Resources.

Joan Przybylowicz, a spokeswoman for the Philadelphia Water Department, which provides some of Bucks' drinking water, said the company has a "vested interest" in cleaning up source waters. She said pollution from the Pennypack and other creeks trickles into the Delaware, which is one source of drinking water. Though the water is treated, Przybylowicz said, "The philosophy today is why pollute the water to begin with. If we minimize and reduce pollution, the cleaner our water will be, the safer it will be."

Scientists are still in the process of collecting data and interviewing community leaders and residents on their concerns with the watershed. Engineers like Szalay have been walking the creek and testing waters for the past year to identify specific problems.

The group will spend the next year devising solutions to the issue of storm water and other problems. One possibility is the implementation of newer storm-water management technology, which could slow the amount of storm water pouring into the creek after rains. Another idea is removing now useless dams from the river, or installing "fish ladders" to help aquatic life move past them.

Project planners also plan to connect local groups so they can share resources and work toward common stream-stewardship goals. For example, Peters' Upper Southampton group enlisted the help of local Boy Scouts to label storm-water drains with warnings that the water drains directly into the creek. They hope this will help prevent locals from disposing of waste in them.

"People want to live where there are green things and high quality streams," said Szalay. "It's a tremendous natural resource."


September 18, 2004

Bucks County Courier Times

Pennypack project involves 3 counties

An effort to clean up the Pennypack Creek, which begins in Bucks, is under way.
The headwaters of the Pennypack Creek are located in Upper Southampton and Warminster and in bordering towns just over the county line in Montgomery County.

These winding tributaries include Southampton Creek and eventually flow into the Pennypack. They play a vital role in the health of the entire 56-square-mile watershed, which affects 650,000 homes and spans three counties.

"The battles for water quality are won and lost in the headwaters," said Shandor Szalay, a scientist with F. X. Browne Inc., the firm that is working to clean up the Pennypack. "What happens in the headwaters affects the entire stream system."

Upper Southampton resident Hans Peters, a member of the Southampton Watershed Association, is working to get his group involved with the Pennypack project. He said a third of the township is in the Pennypack watershed.

"If we wait till things get to a crisis situation, then it's too late," he said.
The problems affecting the health of the degraded Pennypack Creek and its tributaries are typical to other watersheds that have been heavily urbanized. This development destroyed once pristine ecological environments, and, in the case of historic Bucks County, goes back hundreds of years.

The degradation began with the growth of agriculture in the area, which introduced pollutants like fertilizer into streams. Also, there are several dams in the Pennypack system, which were built for mills that no longer exist. These impede the movement of fish and interrupt water flow, said Szalay. But the biggest problem in the watershed, he said, is large volumes of dirty stormwater runoff.

Long ago, forests and fields covered the ground, which helped rain water trickle slowly and steadily back into the stream system after heavy rains.

With the growth of housing developments and paved roads, permeable area for rain water to filter through decreased. Because this increased impervious space, stormwater management systems were built. These now provide direct conduits for dirty storm water that's picked up car oil and fluids, fertilizer and sediment to be dumped into the creek system.

"We are not trying to say economic development is harmful," said Szalay. "You can have an urban environment with a healthy and clean and beautiful stream. It just takes a community that is motivated and engaged and smart strategies that are based on good science."

Pollution in the river, which is often carried in by stormwater runoff, disrupts water quality and creates an environment that is inhospitable to some plants and animals. This results in less wildlife variety, which disrupts the food chain, said Szalay.

He also added that because of the increase in impervious space in the watershed, storm water flows into creeks at a much faster rate, causing erosion.

"The streams are forced to handle more water then they can," said Szalay, noting that the Pennypack empties out directly into the Delaware. "These issues range from very local to even regional [to the] global scale problem of managing oceans."

The project, called the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan, includes many local partners. It is sponsored by the Philadelphia Water Department and was partially funded by a grant from the state Department of Natural Resources.

Joan Przybylowicz, a spokeswoman with the Philadelphia Water Department, which provides some of Bucks' drinking water, said the company has a "vested interest" in cleaning up source waters. She said pollution from the Pennypack and other creeks trickles into the Delaware, which is one source of drinking water. Though the water is treated, Przybylowicz said, "The philosophy today is why pollute the water to begin with. If we minimize and reduce pollution, the cleaner our water will be, the safer it will be."

Scientists are still in the process of collecting data and interviewing community leaders and residents on their concerns with the watershed. Engineers like Szalay have been walking the creek and testing waters for the past year to identify specific problems.

The group will spend the next year devising solutions to the issue of storm water and other problems. One possibility is the implementation of newer stormwater management technology, which could slow the amount of storm water pouring into the creek after rains. Another idea is removing now useless dams from the river, or installing "fish ladders" to help aquatic life move past them.

Project planners also plan to connect local groups so they can share resources and work toward common stream stewardship goals. For example, Peters' Upper Southampton group enlisted the help of local Boy Scouts to label storm water drains with warnings that the water drains directly into the creek. They hope this will help prevent locals from disposing of waste in them.

"People want to live where there are green things and high quality streams," said Szalay. "It's a tremendous natural resource."

Shaila Dani can be reached at 215-949-4206 or sdani@phillyBurbs.com.

Events at Pennypack Environmental Center
Today
What: Watershed Wonders Festival includes a walk down the Pennypack; biologists will shock fish for testing; also features a flea market and more.

Where: 8600A Verree Road, Philadelphia
When: 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
For information: F. X. Browne at 215-362-3878 or www.fxbrowne.com.
Sunday
What: Water Watchers: How to start a neighborhood Stream Monitoring Program
Where: 8600A Verree Road, Philadelphia
When: 7 p.m.
For information: F. X. Browne at 215-362-3878 or www.fxbrowne.com.

photo: (Not available on web) Shandor Szalay explains how the bridge he is standing on caused silt beds, which prevent aquatic habitats from forming in Pennypack Creek. Joe Dixon


September 16, 2004

Article taken with permission from North East Times http://www.northeasttimes.com/index.html

Study finds that cleaning Pennypack is a group effort

By William Kenny, Northeast Times Staff Writer

With a watershed encompassing 56 square miles, the Pennypack Creek in many ways acts as a natural plumbing system for portions of Philadelphia, Montgomery and Bucks counties.

Unfortunately for residents of the Holmesburg neighborhood at the mouth of the Pennypack, whatever goes into the creek and its tributaries usually ends up at their doorsteps.

That’s just one reason that folks throughout the tri-county area should closely regulate the waste products that they allow to pollute the creek, according to environmental specialist Kate Blansett of the Lansdale-based consulting firm F.X. Browne.

At the monthly meeting of the Holmesburg Civic Association on Sept. 8, Blansett gave residents a rundown on recent efforts to assess, protect and improve the watershed through the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan.

Funded by a grant from the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and administered by the Philadelphia Water Department, the two-year plan is an effort to "reconnect Pennypack Creek with the people who live within its watershed," a project description states.
Central to that mission is partnership among various public agencies and non-profit organizations. The Fairmount Park Commission, the Pennypack Ecological Trust, the Montgomery County Planning Commission, the Friends of Pennypack Park and the Friends of Fox Chase Farm are among those groups.

While the water department is doing most of the scientific research of the target area, F.X. Browne is coordinating public outreach with surveys, workshops, festivals, nature walks and other activities, Blansett explained.

Project organizers want to get more people to use the natural resources surrounding the creek, so that more people will have a vested interest in preserving the creek. The project will continue through November 2005.

"The watershed crosses municipal boundaries, so we really have to work together as a watershed group," Blansett said.

Throughout the creek’s history, people have had a largely negative impact on the creek’s health. Mill owners have dammed it in 50 different locations, causing erosion of its banks, Blansett said.

Also, the resulting disruption of the water flow has caused stagnancy and high bacteria counts in the creek. That’s why swimming in it has been prohibited since the 1950s.

In addition, people have built on a large percentage of the land within the watershed, preventing water from penetrating the ground and replenishing the streams in the system.

The problem of faulty waste water and sewer hook-ups in the Philadelphia Water Department’s own underground system has caused raw sewage to pollute the creek and its tributaries in many locations.

"There’s a big problem in Philadelphia with crossed lines," Blansett said. "Sometimes, what comes out of your house can go right into the stream."

And not to be overlooked, added Blansett, are seemingly small things that individual people do, like allowing motor oil to leak in their driveways. Rainwater can easily carry that pollutant into the waste water system and ultimately into the creek.
The Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan puts out newsletters and a calendar of events, among other informational material. To find out more about its activities, contact F. X. Browne at 215-362-3878.


September 14, 2004


September 8, 2004

Lake Carey gets word on water quality
 
BY ROBERT L. BAKER , Wyoming County Press Examiner 09/08/2004
Cottagers Association vice president Walter Broughton, former president Ed Hetzel and consultant Frank Brown discussed water quality at Lake Carey.

LAKE CAREY -Residents of Lake Carey got an eye-opening look Saturday at some long-standing pollution challenges that the lake has been facing.
Frank X. Brown, a consulting engineer overseeing a two-year study of the lake, confirmed the large amount of phosphorous coming into the lake that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency already had identified.


Brown said a significant source of the problem is the septic systems used by practically every homeowner on the lake.
"By today's standards, nearly every septic system here on Lake Carey would not pass (percolation tests), and they shouldn't be here" because most of the soils around the lake aren't suitable for septic systems, he said.
Chemical imbalances caused by the septic systems and other forms of pollution such as sediment runoff are encouraging some forms of algae to grow out of control. The algae use up much of the available oxygen, starving out existing species of plants, insects and fish, he said. This process is called eutrophication.
Walter Broughton, vice president of the Lake Carey Cottagers Association, said the eutrophication was much more advanced than he felt most people had realized.
This study shows that the septic systems are potentially the most serious problem and should be dealt with immediately, said Broughton.
Brown also discussed water well test results. One sampling showed 21 of 50 wells having fecal coliform, and another in which some bacteria counts were "too numerous to count." Fecal coliform comes from human waste, kills off "good" plant, insect and fish species and causes disease.
Broughton noted that there were no current health advisories, but that the report was "a wake-up call -- and if we leave things the way they are over the next five to 10 years, we could have a really serious problem on our hands."
"Is this as life-threatening as people ignoring the speed limits on the roads along the lake?" Broughton asked.
He said it was clear people need to take the issue seriously.
Mark Carmon, DEP spokesperson, said that statutory authority for the next step rests with the governing municipality-in this case Tunkhannock and Lemon townships.
Carmon added that it would be appropriate for both townships to make sure that their local compliance with Pennsylvania regulations governing sewage systems is updated, and then they could take it from there.
Tunkhannock Township supervisor Glenn "Ace" Shupp said that he had been apprised of the situation. For months the joint Lemon and Tunkhannock Township Planning Commission has been drafting a document that might well serve the issue at hand, he said.
Brown outlined some options that residents might wish to explore.
Broughton said that the Cottagers Association would be looking at a range of funding sources to help the cottagers continue monitoring the health of the lake and keeping the residents informed.
He said the present study was funded by a Growing Greener grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection awarded in 2002.
Broughton said Brown's final report has not been issued, but probably would be by the end of September when the grant ran out.
All cottagers, media and other interested parties would receive a copy of it.

©The New Age Examiner 2004

August 30, 2004

Pennypack Watershed Partnership Event: Water Watchers – How to Start A Neighborhood Stream Monitoring Program

EVENT:         “Water Watchers: How to Start a Neighborhood
                    Stream Monitoring Program”

WHEN:         
Tuesday, September 21, 2004, 7:00PM
WHERE:      
Fairmount Park’s Pennypack Environmental Center
                   
8600 Verree Road, Philadelphia, PA 19115

As part of the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan (RCP), a two-year community-based planning process to expand and revitalize watershed stewardship of the Creek, monitoring experts from F. X. Browne, Inc. and the Senior Environmental Corps will teach the basics of citizen water monitoring.  Following this two hour, hands on workshop entitled “Water Watchers: How to Start a Neighborhood Stream Monitoring Program,” F. X. Browne, Inc. will work with the Corps and other watershed partners to develop a citizen volunteer monitoring network for the Pennypack Watershed. 

Forget about science in a lab.  This is the most fun, exciting, and educational way to get involved with caring for your rivers and streams.  Learn what you need to know about coordination, equipment, and monitoring methods to get a monitoring program going in your own community.  Here is your chance to show your support and really get involved!   Space is limited, call 215.362.3878 to pre-register.

More about the Pennypack Watershed Partnership:

The Pennypack Watershed Partnership, a consortium of stakeholders including the Philadelphia Water Department, Friends of Pennypack Park, and Fairmount Park Commission are developing the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan (RCP).

Municipalities within the Pennypack Watershed include the townships of Abington, Horsham, Warminster, Upper Dublin, Upper & Lower Moreland, and Upper Southampton; the boroughs of Bryn Athyn, Rockledge, Hatboro, and Jenkintown; and the Northeast Philadelphia communities of Bustleton, Fox Chase, Mayfair, Holmesburg, Oxford Circle, and Rhawhurst.

Public outreach activities include a survey of watershed residents, interviews of 25 community leaders, and 20 public forums.

F. X. Browne, Inc. will integrate public perceptions with scientific study, to develop goals for watershed restoration and stewardship.  To learn more about upcoming activities of the Pennypack Watershed Partnership, visit www.phillywater.org/pennypack or send an email to info@fxbrowne.com to receive a monthly newsletter and other announcements.


July 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. volunteer time to promote the preservation of open space and natural habitat for the protection of the Wissahickon Creek. 


July 9, 2004

Pennypack Watershed Partnership: Surveys Mailed to Watershed Residents for Rivers Conservation Plan

Lansdale, Pennsylvania – F. X. Browne, Inc., consultant to the Pennypack Watershed Partnership and a leader in watershed and stormwater management and stream restoration, is conducting a Survey of Residents of the Pennypack Creek Watershed.   Two thousand households, selected as a sample of the 650,000 people who reside in the watershed, have been mailed a two-page survey.   The Partnership encourages those who received the survey to please participate and complete and mail back the survey.

The Pennypack Watershed Partnership, a consortium of stakeholders including the Philadelphia Water Department, Friends of Pennypack Park, and Fairmount Park Commission are developing the Pennypack Creek Rivers Conservation Plan (RCP). The principal goal of the RCP is to reconnect the Creek with the residents of the watershed through a two-year community based planning process, to expand and revitalize watershed stewardship of the Creek.

Municipalities within the Pennypack Watershed include the townships of Abington, Horsham, Warminster, Upper Dublin, Upper & Lower Moreland, and Upper Southampton; the boroughs of Bryn Athyn, Rockledge, Hatboro, and Jenkintown; and the Northeast Philadelphia communities of Bustleton, Fox Chase, Mayfair, Holmesburg, Oxford Circle, and Rhawhurst.

The Creek provides an important recreational, aesthetic, and cultural resource to some 650,000 residents, who play a critical role in shaping the future of the Pennypack Creek. This project, which began in November 2003, includes a comprehensive public outreach campaign, which aims to educate the public about watershed management and conservation, evaluate watershed residents’ level of knowledge and interest in water resource issues, and understand public perceptions of  resource impacts, values, and quality.   Public outreach activities in addition to the survey will include interviews of 25 community leaders and 20 public forums.   
F. X. Browne, Inc. will integrate public perceptions with scientific study, to develop goals for watershed restoration and stewardship.

Residents of the watershed interested in learning about upcoming activities of the Pennypack Watershed Partnership can visit www.phillywater.org/pennypack or send an email to info@fxbrowne.com to receive a monthly newsletter and other announcements.


May 13, 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. Scientist Accepted to the Environmental Leadership Program

Lansdale, Pennsylvania – F. X. Browne, Inc. Senior Project Scientist Shandor Szalay was recently accepted to the Environmental Leadership Program in Philadelphia, PA.  The ELP Training Series for Emerging Leaders is designed to build the leadership capacity of emerging leaders at the regional level across the environmental field.  The Philadelphia Regional Network's pilot project training series consists of four retreats that will be held from February through June 2004.  The training series offers unique networking opportunities, intensive leadership and skills training, and time for personal and professional reflection. Associates join a local community of diverse emerging leaders and have an opportunity to make a unique and substantial contribution to the impact of the Philadelphia region's environmental community through collaboration with other emerging leaders.


March 19, 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. Project Engineer Presents Papers at Low-Impact Development Seminar

Lansdale, Pennsylvania – Catherine J. Chomat, Project Engineer at F. X. Browne, Inc., a leader in stormwater management and low-impact development, recently presented four papers at the Low-Impact Development and Stormwater Management Seminar held in Mechanicsburg, PA.  These papers discussed the impacts of stormwater runoff on aquatic ecosystems, retrofitting detention basins, and low-impact development techniques and BMPs.  All of these papers relate to the current NPDES Phase II Stormwater Regulations that many municipalities are currently required to implement.  The papers were very well-received by the 55 consultants, engineers, land developers, and public works officials who attended the seminar.  F. X. Browne, Inc. planned the seminar, organized the group of speakers, and created the agenda for the seminar.


February 4, 2004

F. X. Browne, Inc. Hired to Perform Palatine Lake Study

East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania – F. X. Browne, Inc., a leader in lake and watershed management, was recently hired by the Palatine Lake Village Homeowners Association to complete a lake and watershed management study for Palatine Lake in Pittsgrove Township, Salem County, New Jersey.  Lake and watershed monitoring will be performed to identify problem areas that contribute pollutants to the lake.  Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping and data will be integrated into the project.  F. X. Browne, Inc. will develop a comprehensive lake and watershed management plan to protect and restore Palatine Lake.